...

Order

Newsletter

Distribution

...

Almond, Darren: All Things Pass

Almond, Darren: Terminus

Arnolds, Thomas

Brown, Glenn: Dessins

Brown, Glenn

Butzer, André

Dienst, Rolf-Gunter: Frühe Bilder und Gouachen

Ecker, Bogomir: You’re Never Alone

Förg, Günther

Förg, Günther: Forty Drawings 1993

Galerie Max Hetzler: Remember Everything

Galerie Max Hetzler: 1994–2003

Hains, Raymond

Hatoum, Mona (Kunstmuseum
St. Gallen)

Eric Hattan Works. Werke Œuvres 1979–2015

Hattan, Eric: Niemand ist mehr da

Herrera, Arturo: Series

Herrera, Arturo: Boy and Dwarf

Hilliard, John: Accident and Design

Holyhead, Robert

Horn, Rebecca / Hayden Chisholm: Music for Rebecca Horn's installations

Kahrs, Johannes: Down ’n out

Koons, Jeff

Kowski, Uwe: Paintings and Watercolors

La mia ceramica

Larner, Liz

Mahn, Inge

Marepe

Mosebach, Martin / Rebecca Horn: Das Lamm (The Lamb)

Neto, Ernesto: From Sebastian to Olivia

Niemann, Christoph

Oehlen, Albert (Paintings 2014)

Oehlen, Albert: Interieurs

Oehlen, Albert: Mirror Paintings

Oehlen, Albert: Luckenwalde

Phillips, Richard: Early Works on Paper

Prince, Richard: Super Group

Riley, Bridget: The Stripe Paintings 1961–2012

Riley, Bridget: Paintings and Related Works 1983–2010

Sammlung im Wandel: Die Sammlung Rudolf und Ute Scharpff

Smith, Josh: Abstraction

Tunga: Laminated Souls

de Waal, Edmund: Irrkunst

Warren, Rebecca

Wool, Christopher (2017)

Wool, Christopher: Road

Wool, Christopher: Westtexaspsychosculpture

Zhang Wei

...

Collector's Editions

Out of print

Contact

 

 

Bridget Riley: Paintings and Related Works 1983–2010
With a text by Bridget Riley, a conversation with Lynne Cooke and an extended chronology by Robert Kudielka


English / German
Hardcover
24 x 30 cm
88 pages
34 color illustrations
978-3-935567-53-4
35.00 Euro


 

The British artist Bridget Riley is one of the key figures in Op Art. Her optically dynamic paintings address the issue of seeing itself. Back in the 1960s, the optical effects of her black-and-white pictures created quite a stir: today they are seen as emblematic of that era. In her essay “Work” (2009), she makes the finely tuned development from her earlier monochrome paintings to today’s colorful pictures very comprehensible: “The challenge of color had to be met on its own terms. Just as I had enquired earlier into the square and other geometric forms freed from their conceptual roles, I now felt I had to enquire into color as another pictorial player—in many ways the least emancipated and possibly the most complex of all.” In the process of creating her powerful stripes and rhombuses, Riley first of all focused on effects that emerged through color contrasts. Later, she found a new form for her color works in the combination of verticals and diagonals, to which she started adding vertical curves and waves by the end of the 1990s.


In addition to Riley’s vividly written and richly illustrated essay, this publication also shows her aesthetic development from the 1980s until now in large-format plates, and an interview with Lynne Cook provides more fascinating insight into her way of working. Bridget Riley’s involvement in topics ranging from Matisse’s cut-outs through Bruce Nauman’s video work to traditional Chinese scrolls emphasizes the extent to which she has immersed herself in the possibilities of abstraction.

 

...
In collaboration with Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin, and Ridinghouse, London